2006
08.13

Joe LiebermanAll you ever hear about in partisan discussion is that everyone in the Republican party believes the same thing and supports the party line for the good of the whole, as opposed to the Democrats, who are all across the board. While I beg to differ on the uniformity of the Republican Party, I will be the first to admit that the Democratic Party has challenges in this area.

These challenges have been perpetuated by specific individuals within the party who tend to skew the public view of the party by following their own path. While I am all for a politician following his/her heart, that is no way to gain control of power in politics. Lucky for us, these individuals pissed off enough voters that the electorate spoke. and in true fashion, both of them have bowed out (or in one case, haven’t) lacking grace and respect.

In the case of Senator Joe Lieberman, the three-term Repub ERRRR Democrat from Connecticut who lost his party’s nomination to newcomer Ned Lamont, he has decided to pretend the primary never happened, run as an independent, and show no respect for the voice of the voter. How the once-mighty have fallen. The former VP candidate with Al Gore in 2000 and presidential candidate in 2004 probably never thought a simple hug from GW would hurt him so much, but he has been clearly identified as siding with GW on the war and looks more like a red-headed stepchild in the party everyday. Not only is the Democratic Party fully behind Lamont in the Senate race now, but the party is trying to convince Lieberman to bow out gracefully.

Oh yeah, and then there’s the voters, who spoke quite loudly when they chose Lamont over him. Does he really think he will win the second time around as an independent? He obviously has no respect for our system or for the voters of Connecticut. All he may accomplish by running again is taking votes away from Lamont, which may give the Republican nominee a fighting chance.

Cynthia McKinneyThen there’s Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney from Georgia, who after accusing GW of knowing about 9/11 before it happened and letting it occur, and after beating up on a Capitol police officer and pulling out the race card in her defense, has suffered an even worse fate than Lieberman. Not only did she lose her party nomination for her seat in the House, but she lost by nearly 20%, and to a politician who had never run for a seat higher than the local level.

How does she react? In her typical fashion. She bashes just about everyone she can, including computerized voting systems, and remains defiant against all, even those within her own party, who have been waiting for this day to come.

The point of this rant? The system does work. Those who don’t belong will be retired and replaced with people who truly represent the people. It feels good to know that politicians aren’t always given a blank check, and it feels even better to see the Democratic Party being cleansed of individuals who don’t truly represent the party. I definitely won’t miss either of them.

  1. Lieberman has pissed me off for years. I wonder if Gore’s loss affected him. We all know it gave Gore heart and fire, which was something he lacked when he was, you know, running for President, and it’s almost a shame he’s so animated he makes Doctor Dean look mild. It’s like he went from 0 to 11 (four points for the movie reference).

    So maybe Lieberman was affected too.

  2. im glad this guy didn’t get voted off he’s like a younger Rush limbaugh but not as fat.

  3. TGO on August 13, 2006 at 9:34 pm said:

    im glad this guy didn’t get voted off he’s like a younger Rush limbaugh but not as fat.

    i’m not sure how to take that :\ i have a big mouth like him, but i’m definitely not an extremist, i’m not addicted to pain killers, and like you said, i’m not fat…so, err, thank you LOL.

  4. i’m still pissed that Gore/Liberman didn’t win. I need to get over it.
    I totally believe you that the system does work! I’m glad to hear YOUR thoughts here on TDE. It’s refreshing actually! Thanks for posting here, because if you had posted at another site, I may have just missed your thoughts.

    i’ve been at work, 12 hour days for what seems like the last 10 days, so I haven’t even heard about McKinney. It’s hilarious though. I’m off to dig up more dirt.

  5. like anyone didn’t see the McKinney thing coming. she was an embarassment. I mean how many friggin times do you have to play the race card before you voted the fuck out.

  6. jen on August 14, 2006 at 1:09 am said:

    I totally believe you that the system does work! I’m glad to hear YOUR thoughts here on TDE. It’s refreshing actually! Thanks for posting here, because if you had posted at another site, I may have just missed your thoughts.

    i’m glad you appreciate my column, and i hope you’ll spread the word. if i’ve convinced one person, i’ve accomplished a lot, but there are many more millions that need to believe if we have any hope of turning things around and effecting change. hope to see you commenting for many weeks to come.

  7. Couldn’t disagree more on Lieberman, Dave… I think you’ve flown off the deep end here. Lieberman running on an independent ticket is a beautiful thing. Primary elections – a necessary evil in a two party system – tend to disallow the best, most moderate, most universally acceptable candidates from making it to the general election.

    John McCain, for example, should’ve been the Republican nominee in 2000, and would’ve made a terrific president – still may, though I doubt he can win a nomination. But in that 2000 primary, the rightest of the right wing found him “too liberal”, and we wound up with the current chumpstain.

    As the general election may very well prove this November, Joe Lieberman is likely preferred by more of the general population of Conn. than Lamont, and as such, should run and be elected.

    Party line towing – and, in a broader sense, the two party system – is exactly what’s wrong with American politics, and is precisely what prevents visionary moderates from being elected. In order to get on the ballot, these fools are essentially forced to prove their degree of “leftness” or “rightness” in the primary, and then swing back toward the middle for the general. The system is set up to force a politician to compromise what he believes for the sake of appeasing a party and its base, and that’s absolutely pathetic.

    Instead of chastising Joe Lieberman for his “pro-war” stance, Dems (and anybody who gives a shit about the American political system) should applaud him for having the balls to disagree with his party, something that most brainwashed, sackless politicians wouldn’t dare dream of.

  8. Ryan, i won’t disagree with you about the problem with the two-party system, but the way to deal with that and the way to introduce a third alternative is not to have a clearly-established politician, especially one who wanted to represent his party as a Vice President, walking away from his party PURELY to get elected.

    if he truly wished not to be affiliated with either party (as is the case with Bernie Sanders, Jim Jeffords, and others in the recent past) than I would applaud him for that decision, but that decision should be based on his choice of political affiliation and his belief that his political choices and the needs of the people of Connecticut are not being served by the Democratic or Republican parties, not to circumvent the primary system. i guarantee that IF he does win as an independent, he’ll want back in the Democratic Party. I call that selling out, not introducing an alternative to the two-party system.

    i, too, would love to see a third party created that actually mattered. such a party needs to be started at the grass roots level and should begin with people running for and winning seats in the House. once they build political capital, they can move up to senate races, and by then, the white house.

  9. Dave on August 14, 2006 at 3:14 pm said:

    IF he does win as an independent, he’ll want back in the Democratic Party. I call that selling out, not introducing an alternative to the two-party system.

    I don’t disagree in the slightest. And if I was a person who was loyal to a party instead of a country, then I’d be upset too. But as far as I’m concerned, if a politician is going to sell out, I’d rather he sell out his political party than his personal beliefs.

    I have this argument with a friend of mine who is, though not by his own admission, a neo-con. He is an otherwise intelligent guy, but instead of voting based on the man, he votes on party. “Anything is better than a liberal,” he says. I say, we should have leaders with principles, not leaders who know how to rub the party chair’s rocks and appease the base of annoying/destructive special interests. To hell with party loyalty! How about being loyal to the needs of your country instead of your party? How refreshing would it be to have an elected official who cared more about the fate of our nation than the fate of his party?

    If Joe Lieberman was a good “politician”, he’d have shut his mouth about the war and gone along with the Dems (who, by the way, seem to base their war position on poll numbers). But he didn’t. He took a stance, went on a limb, and didn’t give a damn what the party thinks about it. I’m sorry, but that’s admirable.

  10. Ryan Wallace on August 14, 2006 at 3:30 pm said:

    If Joe Lieberman was a good “politician”, he’d have shut his mouth about the war and gone along with the Dems (who, by the way, seem to base their war position on poll numbers). But he didn’t. He took a stance, went on a limb, and didn’t give a damn what the party thinks about it. I’m sorry, but that’s admirable.

    First off, that is categorically wrong, because if that were true, the Democrats would have been supporting the war in 02 and 03 when a majority of the nation supported the mission.

    as far as your issues with loyalty, you missed the point of my entire previous reply. i agree that Lieberman, as well as all politicians, should be more loyal to their country and their direct constituency than their party, but if Lieberman was being loyal to his constituency and his country, he would not only respect the voice of the people who did not nominate him, but would also respect the institutions that his government have created. primary races, while they determine partisan candidates, are not partisan entities, in that they are written into law (while parties are not). it wouldnt matter whether he was a republican, democrat, independent, green, whig, libertarian, or any other party that has ever existed. he is deliberately circumventing the system.

    he was given his chance to continue to represent CT in the senate and lost that chance by not being chosen to represent the party he has represented for the last two decades. many incumbents have been in the same position as him, lost, and gracefully stepped down, respecting the nature of the system, in the past. if he is so passionate about serving even after this loss, he should involve himself in other aspects of politics or philanthropy over the next six years and run again for the senate seat in ’12.

  11. The Dems – a vast majority – absolutely did support the war at that time. John Kerry wasn’t the only one who was “for it before he was against it”. Virtually every Dem in the House and Senate would love to erase those years from their record, because they got steamrolled into voting pro-war. And I can’t blame them for wanting to erase it, it made the party look terrible and they’re still trying to recover. But that doesn’t change the fact that it happened.

    I do get the traitor aspect of what you’re saying, and I understand why that would bother a Dem. Personally speaking, I’m a people voter, not a party voter, so I’m not the least bit bothered if a politician snubs his party, as long as he doesn’t blow off his real principles. But I’m in a minority there, as voters go. I don’t find it dishonorable to his constituents if Joe chooses to run. I think he feels he got screwed by his party, so he’s going another route and in the process, he’s screwing back. If he runs and they elect him, the people will have spoken, no?

  12. …although whats-her-name from down boogie needs to get over it. everyone is discriminated against whether your white, black, purple, red or a nice shade of crimson- deal with it.